Author: Dr. Rhea Sharma

Dr. Rhea Sharma with dual degrees in Public Health and Medical Journalism and currently practicing as a physician, has become a respected voice in the health sector. She offers expert insights into a wide array of health issues, making her articles a trusted source of general health information.

Artificial sweeteners have gained popularity as people seek healthier alternatives to sugar. However, concerns have been raised about the potential health risks associated with these substitutes. A recent study conducted by researchers from the University of Vienna in Austria explored the impact of sucralose, a commonly used artificial sweetener, on gut health. The findings suggest that sucralose may be a safer option compared to consuming sugar. The study involved 18 participants who were asked to avoid intense sweeteners for three weeks before the study. The participants were then given different beverages containing either sucrose, sucralose, or a blend of sucralose…

Read More

Cardiovascular rehabilitation programs have proven to be highly beneficial in improving health outcomes for individuals who have experienced heart failure, heart attack, heart surgery, or angioplasty. However, a recent study published in The Canadian Journal of Cardiology highlights that women are not reaping the same benefits from these programs as men. The study reveals that women face numerous barriers that prevent them from attending these programs, which can significantly reduce death and re-hospitalization rates. Led by Dr. Sherry Grace, the study emphasizes that women encounter structural barriers at various levels, from the individual to the health system. The researchers developed…

Read More

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects over 10 million people worldwide, causing difficulties in movement. Currently, there are no specific laboratory or imaging tests available for diagnosing Parkinson’s disease, making prognosis challenging. However, a recent study from Lund University in Sweden has identified a new biomarker that can be used to detect Parkinson’s disease and related conditions, even before symptoms develop. Biomarkers are medical signs that aid in diagnosing diseases or indicating specific physiological states. They can be found in various bodily fluids and tissues and can be detected through analysis. These biomarkers can provide measurable information about…

Read More

A recent study published in The Lancet Regional Health – Europe suggests that individuals with physically demanding jobs may have an increased risk of developing dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The study found that those with high levels of occupational physical activity had a 15.5% risk of dementia, compared to a 9% risk for those with low levels of physical activity in their work. Additionally, individuals with intermediate levels of physical activity were found to be at a higher risk of MCI, but not necessarily dementia. The study analyzed data from the HUNT4 70+ Study, which included 7,005 participants…

Read More

Lipids, alongside other essential molecules in the body, are crucial for normal functioning. They play a vital role in various body functions and are integral to the structure of living cells. Researchers from Stanford University have found that certain lipids can serve as indicators for health, disease, and aging. Their study, published in the journal Nature Metabolism, delves into the lipidome, which encompasses all the different types of lipids present in an individual’s plasma. Lipids are diverse compounds that make up the cell membrane of every cell in the body and are involved in many cell processes. They can be…

Read More

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, has long been associated with an increased risk of dementia. However, the specific connection between the two has remained unclear. A new meta-study has shed light on this issue by revealing that older adults who continue to take antihypertensive medications have a 26% lower risk of all-cause dementia compared to those with untreated hypertension. The study, which is one of the largest and most comprehensive of its kind, analyzed data from 17 different investigations involving 34,519 older adults from 15 countries across the globe. The participants, with an average age of 72.5, were followed for…

Read More

New research presented at a scientific conference suggests that weather can have an impact on blood pressure. This study adds to previous research indicating that there is a seasonal variation in blood pressure levels. The findings highlight the need for increased monitoring and potential modifications in treatment for individuals with hypertension. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, affects a significant number of adults worldwide. When blood pressure is elevated, it can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and other complications. Managing hypertension typically involves a combination of medication and lifestyle changes, such as adopting a healthier diet and increasing…

Read More

A recent study published in JAMA Oncology has provided valuable insights into the optimal duration of treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitor drugs for late-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study aimed to determine whether stopping immunotherapy after two years affected patients’ overall survival. The researchers analyzed the medical records of adults diagnosed with late-stage NSCLC between 2016 and 2020 who received immunotherapy. They focused on two treatment paths: stopping treatment at around two years and continuing treatment for more than two years. Among the 1,091 patients who received immunotherapy for the initial two years, there were two main groups:…

Read More

Heart attack survivors can lead fulfilling lives with a high quality of life even two decades after the event, according to a study published in JAMA Cardiology. The research, based on a self-reported survey completed by 2,552 Danish heart attack survivors, found that their long-term health quality of life was comparable to that of the general population. The findings highlight the importance of resources and support to improve survival rates and long-term outcomes after a heart attack. The study also emphasized the need to encourage more survivors to participate in surveys to gather a comprehensive understanding of their experiences. In…

Read More

Blood pressure measurements are commonly taken while individuals are sitting, but this may not provide a complete understanding of their cardiovascular health. Recent research presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension Scientific Sessions 2023 suggests that individuals who only have high blood pressure while lying down, known as supine hypertension, may face similar risks for heart failure, stroke, coronary heart disease, fatal coronary heart disease, and all-cause mortality as those with high blood pressure while both sitting and lying down. Blood pressure is a measure of the force exerted by blood against the blood vessels during heart contractions (systolic) and…

Read More