Author: Dr. Rhea Sharma

Dr. Rhea Sharma with dual degrees in Public Health and Medical Journalism and currently practicing as a physician, has become a respected voice in the health sector. She offers expert insights into a wide array of health issues, making her articles a trusted source of general health information.

A recent study published in JAMA Network Open has found that adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at a higher risk of developing dementia. The study, which analyzed health records of over 100,000 individuals, revealed that adults with ADHD had a 2.77-fold higher risk of developing dementia compared to those without ADHD. However, the study also discovered that individuals with ADHD who received treatment with psychostimulant medications did not have an increased risk of dementia. The study included participants born between 1933 and 1952 and followed them until 2020. During this period, 730 individuals received a diagnosis of ADHD,…

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A new study published in Science has revealed the intricate connections between specific cell types in the human brain and various neuropsychiatric conditions. Researchers emphasize the importance of understanding the molecular distinctions between brain cells in order to develop innovative treatments for disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, and major depression. The study examined the diversity of brain cells and their collaborative functions, highlighting the need to map these different cell types to identify targeted therapies for specific diseases. The researchers analyzed chromatin accessibility in 1.1 million brain cells from various regions and identified 107 unique subcategories of…

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Scientists from Baylor College of Medicine have made a breakthrough in understanding how Candida albicans, a type of fungus, enters the brain and triggers mechanisms that help clear it. This is significant because previous research has linked fungi to chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, but the exact mechanisms behind this connection are not well understood. The researchers conducted a study using animal models to investigate the relationship between C. albicans and Alzheimer’s disease. They found that the fungus secretes enzymes that break down the blood-brain barrier, allowing it to enter the brain. Microglia, the brain’s infection-fighting cells, detect…

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Long COVID, a condition characterized by persistent symptoms after a SARS-CoV-2 infection, affects at least 10% of individuals who have had COVID-19. The underlying causes of long COVID are not fully understood, but some researchers believe that an overactive immune system may play a role. The continuous activation of the immune system leads to a high-inflammatory state, which contributes to the prolonged illness experienced by some individuals. While there are currently no widely effective treatments for long COVID, experts suggest that diet may be a key factor in managing its symptoms. Studies have shown that vaccination and early treatment with…

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A groundbreaking study published in Cancer Cell has revealed new insights into a common genetic deletion found in multiple types of cancer. The deletion, known as 9p21, is present in about 15% of human cancers, including melanoma, bladder, mesothelioma, and certain brain cancers. Researchers have long known that this deletion is associated with poor patient outcomes and reduced response to immunotherapies. However, the study has uncovered the mechanism behind this association and suggests potential solutions. The study found that the 9p21 deletion causes cancer cells to release a compound called methylthioadenosine (MTA), which hampers the immune system’s ability to detect…

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Researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) are developing a new blood test called the OvaPrint test, which shows promise in accurately detecting early-stage ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer is the third most common gynecological cancer worldwide and is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, leading to lower survival rates. The lack of reliable screening tests for early detection is a major challenge in improving outcomes for ovarian cancer patients. The OvaPrint test aims to address this challenge by analyzing small fragments of DNA shed by tumor cells into the blood. By examining the…

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Type 2 diabetes, a prevalent global health condition affecting millions of people, may be reversible through lifestyle changes such as adopting a low-calorie diet, according to some experts. However, the sustainability of these changes remains a topic of debate. Type 2 diabetes is primarily caused by excess weight or obesity, leading to insulin resistance. Weight loss has been shown to improve glycemic control, prompting many treatment options to focus on lifestyle changes, including dietary modifications. A low-calorie diet typically involves consuming between 1,000 and 1,500 calories per day, creating a calorie deficit that leads to weight loss. By maintaining a…

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New research conducted by the Rowan-Virtua School of Osteopathic Medicine suggests that children with autism and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have a reduced ability to eliminate bisphenol A (BPA), a common plastic additive, from their bodies. The study found that children with autism had a 10% lower ability to remove BPA compared to a control group, while children with ADHD had a 17% lower ability. These findings provide biochemical evidence of a link between BPA and the development of autism and ADHD. BPA is a synthetic chemical used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and has been associated…

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The number of people worldwide with dementia is projected to exceed 150 million by 2050, with modifiable risk factors such as hypertension, high body mass index, diabetes, and smoking playing a significant role. However, a recent study conducted in the United Kingdom suggests that these risk factors have a greater impact on dementia risk in people of color compared to white individuals. The study analyzed data from 865,674 individuals aged 65 and over in England and found that certain risk factors had a higher impact on individuals of specific ethnicities. For example, South Asian individuals had a higher risk of…

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A recent study published in GeroScience has examined the unique characteristics of individuals who live to be 100 years old and beyond, shedding light on the factors that contribute to exceptional longevity. The study, unlike previous research, compared blood biomarkers measured earlier in life between individuals who eventually became centenarians and those who did not. The findings revealed that centenarians generally had lower levels of glucose, creatinine, and uric acid compared to others. These biomarkers are associated with metabolic status and organ function. It was also found that centenarians established a distinct metabolic profile by the age of 65, suggesting…

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